Preventing risky drinking in first-year college women: Further validation of a female-specific motivational-enhancement group intervention

TitlePreventing risky drinking in first-year college women: Further validation of a female-specific motivational-enhancement group intervention
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2009
AuthorsLaBrie, JW, Huchting, KK, AC, Tawalbeh, S, Thompson, AD, Larimer, ME
JournalJournal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs Supplement
Pagination77-85
Date PublishedJul
Publication Languageeng
ISBN Number1946-584X (Print)
Accession Number19538915
Keywords*Motivation, Adolescent, Alcohol Drinking/*prevention & control/psychology, Alcohol-Related Disorders/prevention & control, female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Internet, Interpersonal Relations, Models, Psychological, Psychotherapy, Group/*methods, Questionnaires, Risk Factors, Sex Factors, Social Adjustment, Students/psychology/*statistics & numerical data, Treatment Outcome, Universities/*statistics & numerical data
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Female college students have increased their alcohol consumption rates. The current study sought to replicate the effectiveness of a female-specific motivational-enhancement group intervention and extended previous work by adding a 6-month follow-up. The intervention included several motivational-enhancement components delivered in a group setting and included a group discussion of female-specific reasons for drinking. METHOD: Participants were 285 first-year college women. Data collection consisted of an online pre-intervention questionnaire, 10 weeks of online follow-up assessment, and a 6-month online follow-up. Using a randomized design, participants chose a group session, blind to treatment status. Held during the first weeks of the first semester, 159 participants received the intervention and 126 participants received an assessment-only control. RESULTS: Using a repeated-measures analysis of covariance, intervention participants consumed significantly less than control participants on drinks per week (F = 11.86, 1/252 df, p < .001), maximum drinks (F = 11.90, 1/252 df, p < .001), and heavy episodic drinking events (F = 20.14, 1/252 df, p < .001) across 10 weeks of follow-up. However, these effects did not persist at the 6-month follow-up. Moderation effects were found for social motives on all drinking variables, such that the intervention was most effective for those women with higher social motives for drinking. CONCLUSIONS: Efficacy was found for a female-specific motivational group intervention in creating less risky drinking patterns among first-year women, especially women with social motives for drinking. The effect dissipated by the second semester, suggesting the need for maintenance or booster sessions.

URLhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=19538915
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