The video assessment of simulated encounters-revised (VASE-R): reliability and validity of a revised measure of motivational interviewing skills

TitleThe video assessment of simulated encounters-revised (VASE-R): reliability and validity of a revised measure of motivational interviewing skills
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2008
AuthorsRosengren, DB, Hartzler, B, Baer, JS, Wells, EA, Dunn, CW
JournalDrug and Alcohol Dependence
Volume97
Pagination130 138
Date PublishedSep 1
Publication Languageeng
ISBN Number0376-8716 (Print)0376-8716 (Linking)
Accession Number18499356
Keywords*Motivation, Adult, female, Humans, Interview, Psychological/*standards, Learning, Male, Middle Aged, Psychometrics/methods, Psychotherapy/*education/standards, Reproducibility of Results, Social Behavior, Social Environment, Substance-Related Disorders/therapy, Teaching/*methods, Video Recording
Abstract

The video assessment of simulated encounters-revised (VASE-R) is a video-based method, administered in individual or group settings, for assessing motivational interviewing (MI) skills. The 18-item instrument includes three video-based vignettes, in which actors portray substance abusers, with each vignette followed by questions that prompt examinees to write responses that are then scored against MI standards. The VASE-R was administered to two independent samples: (1) substance abuse practitioners participating in a study of MI training methods, and (2) MI training facilitators with a high level of MI skill and expertise. This multi-study report describes basic VASE-R psychometric properties -- including scoring reliability, internal consistency, concurrent validity, and sensitivity to the effects of training -- and then presents proficiency standards based on administration to a sample of MI training facilitators (MI Experts). The findings indicate excellent inter-rater reliability using intra-class correlations for the full-scale score (.85) and acceptable levels for subscales (.44 to .73). The instrument displayed strong concurrent validity with the Helpful Responses Questionnaire (HRQ) and a behavioral sample of clinician behavior with a standardized patient scored using the MI Treatment Integrity (MITI) system, as well as good sensitivity to improvement in MI skill as a result of training. The findings provide an empirical basis for suggesting VASE-R benchmarks for beginning proficiency and expert MI practice.

URLhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=18499356
Go to top