The video assessment of simulated encounters-revised (VASE-R): reliability and validity of a revised measure of motivational interviewing skills

TitleThe video assessment of simulated encounters-revised (VASE-R): reliability and validity of a revised measure of motivational interviewing skills
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2008
AuthorsRosengren, DB, Hartzler, B, Baer, JS, Wells, EA, Dunn, CW
JournalDrug and Alcohol Dependence
Volume97
Pagination130-138
Date PublishedSep 1
Publication Languageeng
ISBN Number0376-8716 (Print)0376-8716 (Linking)
Accession Number18499356
Keywords*Motivation, Adult, female, Humans, Interview, Psychological/*standards, Learning, Male, Middle Aged, Psychometrics/methods, Psychotherapy/*education/standards, Reproducibility of Results, Social Behavior, Social Environment, Substance-Related Disorders/therapy, Teaching/*methods, Video Recording
Abstract

The video assessment of simulated encounters-revised (VASE-R) is a video-based method, administered in individual or group settings, for assessing motivational interviewing (MI) skills. The 18-item instrument includes three video-based vignettes, in which actors portray substance abusers, with each vignette followed by questions that prompt examinees to write responses that are then scored against MI standards. The VASE-R was administered to two independent samples: (1) substance abuse practitioners participating in a study of MI training methods, and (2) MI training facilitators with a high level of MI skill and expertise. This multi-study report describes basic VASE-R psychometric properties -- including scoring reliability, internal consistency, concurrent validity, and sensitivity to the effects of training -- and then presents proficiency standards based on administration to a sample of MI training facilitators (MI Experts). The findings indicate excellent inter-rater reliability using intra-class correlations for the full-scale score (.85) and acceptable levels for subscales (.44 to .73). The instrument displayed strong concurrent validity with the Helpful Responses Questionnaire (HRQ) and a behavioral sample of clinician behavior with a standardized patient scored using the MI Treatment Integrity (MITI) system, as well as good sensitivity to improvement in MI skill as a result of training. The findings provide an empirical basis for suggesting VASE-R benchmarks for beginning proficiency and expert MI practice.

URLhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=18499356
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